allmusic.com

"It's certainly hard not to love this; for the first time since its first Hyperion disc, Music from the Court of Maximilian II, Cinquecento returns to the music of Jacobus Vaet for a full-disc serving...

The whole disc is so good that one struggles at what to say about it; Antevenis virides is a six-voice piece that seldom strays from the purpose of projecting its heraldic text, yet delivers ample interest in rich vocal textures; interesting, surprising chromatic alterations and a sense of constant harmonic change while maintaining a sense of grounding and transparent stillness in a very busy texture. When it is done, it seems too short and you want to it took keep going. No wonder Vaet was so valued by his regal employers as he could praise them in a way fitting for the court, but did not dumb down his style in order to talk to them. Missa Ego flos campi is a vast bounty of polyphony, free floating, gentle, and persuasive and the six-voice texture moves to eight for the "Angus Dei." The individual motets, along with the contribution from Clemens, are all striking for different reasons, though when one listens through the whole disc there is a sense of unity and an overall impression of peace.

Obviously, Cinquecento really loves Jacobus Vaet, and the group makes it easy for the listener to love him, too. Such music is anything but easy to sing, let alone maintain a sense of softness, distance, uniformity of blend, and to make sure no details are sticking out of the texture in a way to distract from the whole. Cinquecento does what it has to do in order to make that work, and as a result, Hyperion's Jacobus Vaet: Missa Ego flos campi is magnificent, a disc that will please both Renaissance music junkies who maintain high standards of vocal performance and non-experts looking for something to take a load off with; it is a serene, yet challenging, and utterly fulfilling disc." *****